Monthly Archives: November 2013

Social Media: A Simple Connection Guide

Today social media is used for several reasons such as building brands, solidifying relationships and interacting with others.  However, one of the benefits of using social media is that it connects people on various levels, as is used by millions of people each day. Regardless of the reasons people choose to use social media, it is always there to relay a message. Below are three ways in which the social media outlets Twitter and Facebook allow users to connect, reconnect and simply interact with one another.

Chosen Interaction

This concept works with both Facebook and Twitter. Facebook allows you to choose who you accept or request as a friend. This makes it is easy to connect only with the people you choose. You can even delete friends once you have accepted requests if you find yourself uninterested in a person’s page. Twitter works in a similar way. You get to choose who you want to follow on Twitter, therefore only the tweets of your favorite people and topics are in your feed. You can also set your preferences to require people to request to follow you rather than accepting all followers automatically. This makes it so you don’t have unknown people seeing your tweets. Bottom line: You can choose your friends!

Quick Contact

Twitter allows you to interact with others in 140 characters or less. This makes it very simple for you to send out a quick tweet to a friend and get an equally short and fast message back. Facebook works in a similar fashion, however it allows for longer messages. You can write on a person’s timeline or message them directly via Facebook chat. Facebook chat is the quickest form of messaging, as you can see when a person is online or offline making it easier to get in contact. Bottom line: No need for lengthy messages!

Minimal Relationship

Facebook allows you to stay connected with people at your own risk. After you accept or get a confirmed friend request you can set your page privacy levels so that certain people can see more information about you than others. Additionally, you can engage with certain friends more than others. The relationship can be as large or as small as you desire. On Twitter your relationship can be as simple as following someone or it can consist of tweeting at each other or re-tweeting. Bottom line: Put in as much effort as you would like!

Facebook and Twitter lead the way for social media outlets in terms of interacting with fellow users. Although they each provide a unique communication appeal to users, they both offer different resources in order for users to stay connected. Their constant and efficient use of messaging will continue to develop as the world of social media expands.

What is your favorite social media site to connect on? Do you or the organization you work with need help with social media? If so, please feel free to contact us.  As always if you like what you read, be social and share.

 

 

How Branding Unified a City

By: Ben Okun

On April 15th 2013, tragedy struck Boston at the city’s most celebrated event. The Boston Marathon bombings effected countless lives and shook a nation, which has seen a rise in terrorism acts in recent years. In the immediate aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing, The One Fund was created to assist the victims and families affected, and has since raised over $60 million. Moreover, Boston saw the birth of the phrase, “Boston Strong,” which served as a rallying cry, unifying a proud city during hard times.

As “Boston Strong” quickly gained momentum, it became more than just a phrase; it became Boston’s brand. Within days of the tragedy, “Boston Strong” appeared on shirts, hats, ribbons and bracelets. It was put up on billboards across the city of Boston and adorned many of Boston’s public transportation. The TD Garden hosted a benefit concert later that month featuring Aerosmith, Boston and Jimmy Buffet, and the concert was properly labeled, “Boston Strong.” During their amazing playoff run that culminated in a Stanley Cup victory, the Boston Bruins put “Boston Strong” on a lot of their merchandise, bringing the entire city of Boston together.  Just last week, the Boston Red Sox became World Champions, winning one of the most thrilling World Series’ of all time. Like the Bruins, the Red Sox used “Boston Strong” as a rallying cry that gained the support of the entire city and captured the hearts of people everywhere. 

How is it that two words, inspired by a horrible tragedy, could stick for so long and change the outlook of an entire city? There is no definitive answer, but it goes to show how powerful a brand can be when utilized effectively. The “Boston Strong” brand is simple, straightforward, flexible and emotional. “Boston Strong” also ties into the resiliency and solidarity that truly define the city of Boston. You are able to display the brand on multiple platforms and can also use it as a hashtag and talking point to gain awareness on social media. As soon as you see the words “Boston Strong,” you know exactly what it means and what it refers to. “Boston Strong” is everything a successful brand should be and it shows no signs of slowing down.

“Boston Strong” also shows that branding and advertising don’t always have to have a goal of generating revenue. While “Boston Strong” helped produce more than $60 million in proceeds towards the victims of the bombing, it has done arguably even more for the psyche of the city of Boston. It has unified the Bostonians under a common banner and has restored a sense of pride. “Boston Strong” presented emotional appeal to a city that was in desperate need of latching onto something meaningful.

With two different championships, tens of millions of dollars raised and an emotional transformation since that fateful day, there is no question that Boston is  “strong.” While the victims and those affected will never be forgotten, Boston should be proud of how they have responded and joined together under such dire circumstances.

As always, I welcome any comments and if you like what you read, be social and share.