Tag Archives: Gina Mason

Grammar Game

By: Gina Mason

Word traps…there are a lot of them out there and you would be surprised how often people fall victim to common grammar mistakes. (We are all guilty of it!) Whether it’s something as simple as the misuse of a homophone such as “their, they’re or there” or mixing up the definition of a word such as irreverent or irrelevant, it is important to make sure your grammar game is strong (especially, when writing a big email or working on a presentation). For some grammar snobs, the misuse of a pronoun or verb can send them through the grammatical glass roof and may cost you that big deal.

I recently read a great article in Forbes that had a useful breakdown of some of the most common grammar missteps in business. Here are some common words and some easy-to-remember tricks to ensure (see example 1) we stay on the right grammar track:

“Ensure vs. Insure

You insure a car or a house. Think: insurance.

You ensure the company will be a fit for you by doing your research.

Capitol vs. Capital

The Capitol is a building in Washington, DC. Do note its proper noun status.

Capital is money, as in a venture capital firm. It’s also what you’re referring to when you ask someone to stop emailing in ALL CAPS—and the spelling you’d want to use if asked to list all of the state capitals.

Perspective vs. Prospective

You have a unique perspective, or take, on events.

Prospective means potential, as in, the prospective candidates are impressive.

Gauge vs. Gouge

You’ll gauge your client’s reaction to the new slogan (i.e. take his or her temperature).

You’ll gouge out your eyes if you have to stare at your presentation slides much longer.

Moot vs. Mute vs. Moo

The point is moot—or, in other words, it doesn’t matter.

The TV is on mute.

And if you think the point is moo, you’ve watched too much Friends.

Prosperity vs. Posterity

Prosperity means wealth, so if you’re toasting to prosperity, you’re celebrating your fortune.

Posterity means future generations. You could toast to posterity as well, so long as you know you’re raising a glass to your descendants.

Principal vs. Principle

You went to the principal’s office when you misbehaved in school.

Principal can also mean main, as in principal investor.

And a principle is a tenet you believe in.

Tenet vs. Tenant

While we’re on the subject, a tenet is a rule.

A tenant is a renter.

Rein vs. Reign vs. Rain

You rein in your tendency to overreact, much like you use the reins to control a horse.

Meanwhile a monarch reigns over his or her empire, while rain falls from the sky.

Solidarity vs. Solitary

You show solidarity by joining or supporting a cause or social movement.

If you’re the solitary member on a project, you’re the only person working on it. (Note: Solitary often includes a connotation that means lonely or isolated.)

Weary vs. Wary vs. Leery vs. Leer

Weary means tired. It can also mean jaded, which is why some people confuse it with…

Wary, which means suspicious. You’d be wary of a candidate with terrible references.

Leery also means suspicious. You would be rightfully leery of a hiring manager who never showed up for your interview.

Finally, to leer is to stare in an inappropriate way.

Accept vs. Except

You accept an offer from your dream company.

You would go to the upcoming event, except you already have plans.

Broach vs. Brooch vs. Breach

You’ll broach the subject tomorrow, while wearing your grandmother’s lucky brooch.

Neither of which has anything to do with a breach of contract.

Fleshing vs. Flushing

You flesh out the findings by going into more detail.

You flush something down in the restroom.

Banal vs. Blasé

The topic is banal, a.k.a., boring.

He’s known for his blasé attitude—meaning he’s never flustered and seems generally unconcerned.

Skim vs. Scan

When you skim a document, you’re glancing at pretty quickly.

Scan can be used as a synonym for skim, but it also can mean reading something in detail (much like the oft-misused peruse). Scan can also be used in a medical context, e.g., a full-body scan.

Underserved vs. Undeserved

Underserved communities suffer from a lack of resources.

Undeserved means something was not merited, like an unwarranted dismissal.

Proceed vs. Precede

If someone says, “let’s proceed,” he means “let’s get started” or “let’s continue.”

Something that precedes something else, comes first (e.g., winter precedes spring, spring precedes summer).

Intents vs. Intense

Your intents are noble.

But your intense gaze is creeping the interviewer out.

Squash vs. Quash

You might eat squash after a game of squash in which you squashed your opponent like a bug. (What an eventful lunch break!)

On the other hand, you’d quash a merger that you’ve reconsidered and decided is a bad move.

Irreverent vs. Irrelevant

You might think irreverent just means colorful, but it often connotes something that is disrespectful, rude, even blasphemous.

While something that’s irrelevant doesn’t relate to the matter at hand.

Amused vs. Bemused

If you’re amused, you’re enjoying yourself, whereas…

If you’re bemused, you’re confused.

Farther vs. Further

Farther and further both measure distance. But farther is more often used for a distance you can actually measure. So, my favorite lunch spot is farther from the office than the sandwich spot up the block.

If you don’t want to go there, we don’t need to take this conversation any further.

Elicit vs. Illicit

If you’ve read this far, you deserve to know that elicit means provoke, as in elicit a response.

Illicit means illegal or forbidden—illicit activities have no place in the office (or, really, anywhere).”

I’m sure most of us have all fallen into these grammar traps and the best advice that I have for those who are unsure of the proper use of the word is USE GOOGLE! Google can pretty much tell us everything these days and if not, use two of my favorite grammar websites are Grammar Girl and Grammarly for quick and dirty grammar tips. I hope you found this post to be helpful and this will help us all step up our grammar game.

As always, if you like what you read be social and share.

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Tips & Tricks for Your Next Instagram Post

By: Gina Mason

Instagram may be one of the hottest social media platforms out there right now. As of January 2015, there are more than 300 million active users, over 30 billion photos that have been shared and the average users spends at least 21 minutes a day browsing and liking photos.

As the app continues to grow and expand so does its capabilities and features. With its constant updates, it’s hard to keep track of all of the new useful features. I recently read an article on SocialMediaWeek.org and wanted to share some great tips for the photo-sharing app.

Here are a few of my favorite tips from the article:

Send Selective People Photos

Want to share a photo with friends without it going into the Newsfeed? Use the Instagram Direct feature. “This feature lets you share the photo with up to 15 people, and they can comment on the photo like normal. Items shared this way will not turn up in a search and can be deleted. To use Instagram Direct, choose Direct when you’re at the “Share To’” page. Then select your recipients by tapping the circle next to their names or by typing their names in the ‘To’ space. Finish off by hitting Send.”

Hide Annoying Accounts

Finally! There is a secret “hide” button for those friends who still don’t understand the concept of Instagram. You know, those friends who overshare or upload 10 photos of their cats/children within five minutes and blow up your Newsfeed, but you can’t officially unfollow them. “To ignore Direct posts from a person, go to the tray icon at the top right of your home page. Tap the horizontal three-dots button (iPhone) or vertical three-dots button (Android). Select “Ignore all posts from this user.”

Hide Photos

Ever have a friend tag you in an embarrassing or unflattering photo? You can hide it now! “To hide a tagged photo, tap the offending photo and your Instagram handle will appear. Tap your handle. When a menu pops up, select “Hide from My Profile.” If you don’t want to be tagged at all in the photo, go to the More Options button and choose “Remove Me from Photo.” If you don’t want to remove your tagged photos one by one, you can adjust your settings to review them first. Just go to “Photos of You”, tap on your settings at the top right corner and select the “Add Manually” option.”

Hashtag After

Ever post a photo and forgot to use hashtags? “You can still do so by adding them in the comments. People will still be able to find your photo when searching the hashtag you used. This method also has the added bonus of eliminating the dreaded hashtag paragraph when you share the same photo onto your other social media accounts.”

Forget to share to your other sites?

If you have posted a photo on Instagram and forgot to share it on your other social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, you can now. “Tap the button with three dots at the bottom of the photo. Select Share from the menu and choose which site you want to share it to. If you choose Twitter, your photo URL will appear as you compose your tweet, so you’ll know if you’ve hit the 140 character limit.”

I hope you found these tips to be helpful. To read the rest of the tips, here is the link to the full article:

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2015/05/10-useful-instagram-tips-tricks-you-should-know/

Happy Instagram-ing!

As always, if you like what you read be social and share.

Royal Baby Fever

By: Gina Mason

Hear ye, hear ye! Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge arrived last Saturday and as to be expected, the world is still buzzing about her grand entrance.  After much anticipation, the news of the little bundle of joy spread quickly and social media nearly exploded with the reveal that William and Kate gave birth to a beautiful baby girl.

As the #1 topic that was trending globally, people from all over the world joined in the conversation about the new princess. Here are some fun social media facts and stats about the #RoyalBaby’s arrival:

  • The tweet sent by @KensingtonRoyal announcing the birth, “Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge was safely delivered of a daughter at 8:34am” was retweeted 47,000 times and favorited 42,000 times.
  • Not only did the announcement garner over a million tweets, but the conversations peaked at 4,500 tweets per minute around 11:34am according to Twitter.
  • According to the DailyMail, “Hashtracking reveals that the majority of people posting about the baby were women (61%) and the highest proportion of tweets were surprisingly sent from the U.S. (23%).
  • The announcement of Princess Charlotte’s birth topped the arrival of her big brother as she received over 1 million #RoyalBaby tweets while Prince George’s birth generated only 900,000.
  • The tweet revealing the name, “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to announce that they have named their daughter Charlotte Elizabeth Diana” was shared and favorited more than 92,980 times.
  • More than 300,000 tweets mentioning ‘Charlotte’ were made following the name confirmation.

Not only were news outlets and people everywhere posting about the #RoyalBaby, but also a number of big brands took the opportunity to chime in the baby banter on social media.  Here are a few of my favorite tweets from big brands:

The @Disney Royal Babies gave Princess Charlotte a royal welcome with this fun video clip:

disney

@BritishAirways got creative when the Princess touched down:

BA

@Nissan got the royal chariot running:

nissan

@MLB reminded us that it has Royals babies too…

MLB

@CocaCola_GB shared the love with the Royal Family:

Coke

@PizzaHutUK even had a special delivery of its own:

Pizza Hut

I loved seeing all of the baby banter that has been going on and loved that many brands used this real-time event to engage their followers.  This is a great example of brands thinking outside of their “strictly promotional” box and coming up with creative ways to stay relevant in the conversation.

To see some additional brands that posted about the #RoyalBaby, check out this article on Buzzfeed: http://www.buzzfeed.com/tomphillips/hashtag-engagement#.anE85Vkqx

To see some brands that had a #RoyalFail, check out this Mashable article: http://mashable.com/2013/07/23/royal-baby-real-time-marketing-brands/

Did you join in the Twitter-chatter about the #RoyalBaby? What did you think of some of the brands that joined the baby conversation?

As always, if you like what you read be social and share.

Bryan Price Takes on the Media

By: Gina Mason

Professional sports have changed in many ways over the last few decades. From instant-replays to pace-of-play and heads-up tacking rules, all aspects of pro sports are now under a microscope and aggressively dissected by their respective leagues, officials, media and the public. Thanks to the invention of fantasy sports and our tech-savvy culture, the way we consume and talk about sports in general has changed drastically. The media and the public now expect a lot more out of coaches and players than ever before and coaches especially are put in the hot seat all of the time and forced to provide reasoning for every decision that they make.

From my experience working with a professional baseball team, I have witnessed this firsthand and truly applaud the players and coaches (and the staff that media trains them) who have been able to maintain their composure and confidence in the spotlight. For those of you who don’t really know much about baseball, the media gets an incredible amount of access to the players and the coaches behind the scenes. There is usually a press conference before and after each game with the manager, reporters are allowed in the locker room before batting practice, allowed on the field during batting practice and back into the locker room after the game. From a media standpoint, this is fantastic and it at allows reporters to get a great deal of insight from the team and provide fans with the insider scoop that they crave. However, this constant access can also put a lot of pressure on the players and the coaches as they constantly have to be ready to face a media firestorm.

Last week, the media scrutiny became all too much for Cincinnati Reds manager, Bryan Price. During a pre-game interview, Price unleashed his welled up emotions on the media after a reporter wanted to know why All-Star catcher Devin Mesoraco was not with the team for a game in St. Louis. Price blurted out 77 “f-bombs” during the five-minute, 34-second expletive-filled tirade and he targeted the media for breaking a story about the catcher the night before. “I don’t know what the importance is for everyone to know if we have a player that’s not here,” Price said. “We don’t benefit at all from the other teams knowing we don’t have a player.”

Call it pent up frustration or a moment of insanity, Price went on questioning the way in which the media behaved and why they have to always know everything, “I don’t get why it’s got to be this way. Has it always been this way where we just tell f****** everybody everything? So every f****** opponent we have has to know exactly what we have. Which f****** relievers are available, which guys are here and which guys aren’t here, when they can play, and what they can do. It’s nobody’s f****** business. It’s certainly not the opponent’s business. We have to deal with this f****** b*******.I like to talk — and I have spoken as candidly as I can with you people, if that’s not good enough, I won’t say a f******thing. I’ll go, ‘yes sir, no sir.’ And I can do that. But f***, I’ve been as candid as I can f****** be about this team and our players, and we’ve got to deal with this s***, every f****** team that we f****** play has to know every f****** guy that’s here and what they can and can’t do? F*** me. It’s a f****** disgrace. I’m f****** sick of this s***. It’s f****** hard enough to f****** win here to have f****** every f****** opponent know exactly what the f*** we bring to the table every day. It’s f****** horse****. I don’t like it. It’s what I’m saying. To make it very clear, I don’t like the way that this s***’s going — at all. I don’t like it. I don’t think you guys need to know everything. And I certainly don’t think you need to see something and tweet it out there and make it a f****** world event. How the f*** do we benefit from them knowing we don’t have Devin Mesoraco? How do we benefit from that? They benefit from it. I just want to know how we benefit from these f****** people know we don’t have a player here. Can you answer that? How is that good for the Reds?

Price definitely struck out with his delivery and I am sure the Reds PR team stood there in horror witnessing a verbal car crash in slow motion. However, many are saying that despite his foul language, Price’s message was not that outlandish. The necessity of knowing everything at all times in real-time may be taking away from the game and is putting too much pressure on the players and coaches, not only in baseball but in all sports. While some feel that as a professional athlete or coach, you waive your right to privacy and must address your critics daily.

I tend to agree that the public doesn’t need to know every single thing that is going on with each and every player at all times and that he does have a point that it can somewhat take away from a team’s competitive edge. However, I will say that as a manager of a professional baseball team, addressing the media is part of his job and he is getting paid a lot of money to do so. I would highly suggest that he should consider a few more media training sessions after that fiasco.

What do you think of Price’s rant? Do you think it was justified?

To hear all five minutes of Price’s rant, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wROe2dzJDqY

As always, I welcome your like comments and if you what you read be social and share.

Secrets from Shark Tank’s Daymond John

By: Gina Mason

As embarrassing as it may sound, I must admit that many (most) of my Friday nights are no longer spend out at the clubs, but rather at home watching my favorite show on ABC, Shark Tank. Call it my interest in the entrepreneurial spirit (or lack of a social life), I just cannot get enough of the wheeling and dealing that goes on during the show. Outside of some of the ingenious ideas that people come up with, I am absolutely fascinated with the thought-process and negotiating skills of each “shark.”

Due to my obsession with the show, I recently read an article on Inc.com that recapped a speech that business mogul and Shark Tank star, Daymond John did during an Inc. GrowCo conference in Nashville and I wanted to share some of his wisdom. I find John’s story to be the most inspiring out of all of the sharks and applaud him for all that he has accomplished.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with John, he created a clothing empire that started with his handmade line, Fubu. John is the epitome of a rags-to-riches story as he was raised in Queens by a single mother who worked three jobs to provide for the family. Using the sewing skills his mother had taught him, he started making clothing in his mother’s apartment and selling it on the street. After a lot of hard work and hustling, sales for his hats and shirts took off and today he is worth over $250 million dollars.

Thanks to Lindsay Blakely’s recap, here are a few of the secrets for building your business that John shared at the conference:

Act bigger than you are.

“John realized early on that although he knew he wanted to be a part of hip-hop culture, he couldn’t sing, dance or produce music. But he loved fashion. Dominating the hip-hop clothing business became his one and only focus. “I couldn’t hit a target I couldn’t see,” he recalls. The only problem was that he had no money and no knowledge about how to start a fashion company. So he did what many enterprising entrepreneurs have done before him: He faked it until he made it. The first step was getting the right people to stand behind the brand.

John made 10 Fubu shirts and using his connections, showed up wherever influential rappers would be–often at music video studios or as was the case with LL Cool J, his house. He charmed them into trying on the shirts, snapped their photos and then took back the shirts. Fubu still wasn’t a real company with real merchandise, but after two years the brand looked huge, John says–or at least, it looked like all of the cool hip-hop kids wore it.”

Win on scrappiness and savvy.

“John eventually learned that anyone who is anyone in the fashion business needs to show up at the annual Magic Show in Las Vegas, a trade show for clothing manufacturers. He couldn’t afford a booth or even a ticket. So he and a few friends turned a room at the Mirage hotel into a makeshift showroom. John sneaked into the convention and persuaded buyers to make a trip over to the room. By the end of the show, he had closed $300,000 in orders. Fubu later went on to sell, with the help of a distribution deal with Samsung’s textile division, $30 million of clothing in three months.

Or there was the time that LL Cool J was slated to appear in and write the lyrics for a Gap ad. John persuaded him to show up for the shoot wearing a Fubu hat and rap about the brand. (If you listen to the lyrics closely, he mentions For Us By Us, the tag line behind Fubu). The way John tells it, Gap had wanted the rapper to help the clothing line break into the hip-hop market. But after the ad aired and then re-aired, Fubu was the real winner behind the deal–revenue climbed to $400 million. Not a coincidence, the entrepreneur says.”

Remember: You are the brand.

“If you’re an aspiring Shark Tank contestant, this tip is for you. John says one of the most important things you can do to set yourself up for success when you pitch your company is to come up with two to five words that define you as an entrepreneur. “If you don’t know what you stand for, you leave it up to us,” he says, referring to the other sharks on the show.

Speaking of those sharks, whatever you do, learn what each shark is looking for. “After six years of the show, I have no idea how people go on Shark Tank and they don’t understand what the sharks want,” he says.”

I think John not only offered some great insight, but also some incredible inspiration for the aspiring or up-and-coming entrepreneurs out there. He defied the odds and truly created his own success by following a dream, working hard and taking advantage of the right opportunities.

What did you think of his tips?

For those of you who want to catch up on the latest episodes of Shark Tank, visit: http://abc.go.com/shows/shark-tank

I welcome your comments and as always, if you like what you read be social and share.

Elements for the Perfect Logo

By: Gina Mason

What do Nike, McDonalds, Coca-Cola, BMW, ESPN and IBM all have in common? Well, besides being on Forbes 100 Most Valuable Brands List, they all have very distinctive logos that can instantly be recognized by millions of people all over the world. Logos are incredibly powerful and they not only dictate brand loyalty, but they can also dictate the success of a company. From a branding perspective, having a great logo is absolutely imperative if you want to stand out amongst your competition and appeal to your audience. However, coming up with that perfect logo isn’t always so easy. For those of you who are looking to create a new logo or rebrand, here are a few elements to keep in mind:

Aesthetically Appealing
Just like anything else in life, first impressions are extremely important especially when trying to make your logo aesthetically appealing to your audience. A good logo will trigger positive emotions in your mind and is more likely to create brand loyalty while a bad logo will do the opposite.

Relevancy
Your logo is your calling card and must be relevant to your audience and your industry. Your logo should be a visual representation of your business objectives and should speak directly to your audience. MagicDust Designers warn, “avoid unnecessary elements that may be visually pleasing but don’t support your message.”

Simplicity
Some of the best logos are simple (i.e. Nike “Swoosh”) and an understated logo isn’t always an understatement. Some of the most powerful logos in the world are incredibly simple and their simplicity make them extremely effective (GE, Apple, Disney). MagicDust Designers suggest, “Flat shapes, bold lines and clear type are hallmarks of simple logos that never run the risk of appearing busy or worse, confusing.”

Versatility
A good logo has to work well on a number of different platforms including the web, collateral materials and ads and this is not always something people account for in the planning process. The font should be balanced and readable at any size. Also, don’t forget about choosing the right colors. A full-color logo may not translate well to B&W or print as well on different types of paper so keep that in mind as well.

Timelessness
According to Huff Post’s Bianca Rothschild, “a good logo withstands the test of time. It may need some touchups to keep it fresh and prevent it from looking dated our out of style, but that’s all it should require. Changing your logo when it already has memorability in place is bad for your branding. You want one logo that works for as long as it can.”

Creating a great logo can take a lot of time and effort, but is it all worth it in the end. Don’t get discouraged and don’t be afraid to ask for several opinions. Speaking of logos, what to test your logo knowledge? Check out this logo quiz here: http://www.creativebloq.com/logo-design/quiz-can-you-guess-logo-1012976

I welcome your comments and as always, if you like what you read be social and share.

#FerrellTakesTheField and Spices Up Spring Training

By: Gina Mason

This year’s Major League Baseball Spring Training is one for the record books and one player is sure to go down in infamy for pulling off one of the most bizarre antics in baseball history. On Thursday, this player was traded to 10 different teams and played 10 different positions during five games in the span of one day. However, this was not your average professional baseball player. This type of accomplishment could only be pulled off by the man, the myth, the legend, Will Ferrell.

The comedian/actor laced up his cleats and hit the baseball field in a stunt of epic proportions to defy the odds of baseball, honor baseball legend Bert “Campy” Campaneris and most importantly, raise money and awareness for the fight against cancer.

Thanks to the brilliance of HBO and Funny or Die, Ferrell played all 10 positions (including DH) for 10 teams in the Cactus League in Arizona as part of an upcoming TV special that will air later this year. Relying on cars and “choppahs” (helicopters) to get from game to game, Ferrell managed to go 0-2 (2K) with one foul tip on offense, he also intentionally walked one batter while pitching, skillfully coached third base with awesome signs, grew an impressive beard and was traded for a Churro Dog and a D-bat Dog.

Prior to the games, Ferrell said that he felt confident going into the day and that “these teams need a clubhouse presence and my presence is a flabby 47-year-old guy that doesn’t know how to play. But I have life experience and I’m willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done,” during a pre-game(s) interview with ESPN’s Mike & Mike.
Not only did Ferrell pull off this crazy stunt, it was all documented via live-tweeting with the hashtag #FerrellTakesTheField.

Here is a recap of the day, thanks to ABC News:

“GAME ONE: Ferrell kicked off the first game by playing shortstop for the A’s. However, his time with the team was short, as he was traded to the Mariners almost immediately. “The A’s announced that Will Ferrell has been traded to the @Mariners for a CATBNL (Comedic Actor To Be Named Later). #FerrellTakesTheField,” the Mariners announced on Twitter. He played second base for the Mariners.

GAME TWO: Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
As a kid, Ferrell rooted for the Angels, “before they became the L.A. Angels of Anaheim, Adjacent to L.A., Just Southern California, South, North of San Diego Angels,” he joked. He kicked off game two playing for his hometown team, taking center field in place of Mike Trout and during his time on the field, successfully fielded the ball.
Afterward, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs, where he played first and coached third base.
Ferrell also batted, though he struck out!

GAME THREE: Cincinnati Reds at Arizona Diamondbacks
In a blockbuster trade, the Arizona Diamondbacks acquired Ferrell from the Chicago Cubs in exchange for two specialty hot dogs — a Churro dog and D-Bat dog — before playing Cincinnati.
It’s unclear if the hot dog he was later seen eating was one he was traded for.
Ferrell lined up in left field for the Diamondbacks.
Ferrell was later traded to the Reds and suddenly grew a lengthy grey beard. He played third base for Cincinnati.

GAME FOUR: San Francisco Giants at Chicago White Sox
Ferrell was on the move again later, arriving as a member of the Chicago White Sox via helicopter.
He struck out as a White Sox player and was quickly traded to the San Francisco Giants.
GAME FIVE: Los Angeles Dodgers at San Diego Padres
Ferrell pitched for the Dodgers before he was traded to the Padres to become San Diego’s right fielder.”

What may seem like an extravagant ploy, the craziness of the day did not go unnoticed and was extremely successful in terms of fundraising. According to @CBSSportsMLB, Ferrell was able to raise $1 million dollars to fight cancer and he will also auction off all of the uniforms and equipment he used during the day for the cause. It seemed as though the players, fans and all involved really enjoyed the comedic relief of Ferrell’s absurdity, but not all appreciated what he was doing. Former NFL coach and broadcaster John Madden found the stunt offensive, ““That’s a lack of respect. That’s a lack of respect for the game and a [lack of] respect for what players have to do to get where they are.”

As a huge Will Ferrell and baseball fan, I loved this stunt and that fact that it raised money for a great cause. Some view the game of baseball as “boring” and I think this spiced it up a little and showed the MLB as an organization may not be so “old school” as many previously thought. While I understand how some view the stunt as “disrespectful” to the game, I think because it was raising awareness for a good cause it was totally acceptable. After all, this was Spring Training not Game 7 of the World Series. I also loved the social media updates from all of the teams involved and hope that baseball as well as all professional sports organizations can take advantage of opportunities like this to generate awareness and give back to charities that need help.

What did you think of this stunt? Did you find it funny or disrespectful?
As always, I welcome your comments and if you like what you read be social and share.