Tag Archives: Red Carpet Events

Hey, I’m Here! 10 Tips for Live-Tweeting

By: Dallas J. Short

YourDictionary.com defines live-tweeting as “posting on Twitter during an event in an ongoing way,” while that seems basic enough, there is much more to it than that. Live-tweeting gives your live event a life in the digital world. It expands the reach of your event and allows attendees and non-attendees to both be involved and engage with you. I’m a fan of live-tweeting, both at our own events and also following along with sporting events and television shows. Here are ten tips I came up with that could help you with live-tweeting from your next event.

1) Pound it! The #Hashtag is key, it will be the way people follow along and helps stream the information. Pick a short and applicable hashtag and make sure you let people know what it is. When you promote the event beforehand, include the hashtag, so people who cannot make it know they can still follow along. You need to promote the hashtag heavily the day of the event and you should have the hashtag on promo materials around the event as well. You want others engaging, adding to and using it as well. Every live-tweet you send about the event should include this hashtag.

2) Solo mission! It will be most effective if you have only one person tweeting from the event. It helps define the voice of the live-tweets and gives it a personality. You do not want a lot of people from your organization tweeting from the account, it will seem disorganized, all over the place and hard to follow. One person handling it right gives it more life.

3) Sharing is caring! Tweet out pictures and videos during the event. You want people to see what they are missing, without making them feel left out. Yes, you want photos of the layout, what’s going on, speakers and celebrities in attendance. You also want to include people attending, be sure to tag @ them as well. They will more likely be faster to tweet, favorite, retweet and will include the hashtag, helping your event’s live-tweeting presence grow.

4) Insider info! Including behind the scenes looks and tweets not only makes non-attendees feel like they’re “in the know” and receiving exclusive information. It also gives attendees a reason to follow along with the live-tweeting, because they are already aware of what is going on in front of their eyes and you are basically taking them backstage and behind the velvet rope.

5) Live in the moment! You and your event have a purpose, a mission and a message you want to get out there. This message should be pushed before the event, at the event and after the event. However, this message should only be sprinkled throughout your live-tweeting. You do not want to appear robotic, people follow live-tweeting like they are there hanging out with a friend. If your friend just kept repeating themselves all day, you would look for a way to ditch them. Don’t get ditched. I would suggest you have those “mission/message” tweets scheduled already (Hootsuite, etc.,) so the person live-tweeting can focus on the live event conversation and not get distracted by making sure they hit the certain number of “required” purpose messaging.

6) Don’t drop the ball! If the conversation and engagement are flowing, there is not a limit on live-tweeting. Keep it going and keep it growing, the more the merrier. If it is not flowing, you do need to make sure you are not pushing the issue. Having some slow moments or downtime is not the end of the world. You should never just stop live-tweeting though. Finish out the event. Do not make people wonder why it stopped? What went wrong? If someone was not there and searches the hashtag after the event and it just goes silent, it will raise red flags and could prevent people from attending in the future, if they perceived the quietness as an unsuccessful event. Give it your all, start to end.

7) Tune in, tune out! If you end up with a heckler or someone who is going out of their way to bash your event for no reason, ignore them. Do not waste your tweets sending out dislike or negative feelings. If someone has a concern or an issue it is alright to address that to clear up a problem or confusion. The majority of people are following your tweets and using your hashtag like they are tuning into their favorite television program and they want to be involved. They care about what is going on and what you are sharing with them. They do not want to follow a hashtag thread that looks like a bad, bickering reality show and miss out on the fun and happenings of the actual event.

8) Respond, react! You might not be able to follow the entire hashtag thread of what others at the event are saying, some of it might not even need you to respond, and it will just be people using your hashtag. Do look for questions that you can answer, positive interactions to favorite and retweet. Tweet at and acknowledge them. Making people feel involved and valued is key to the live-tweeting success. I would also suggest asking some type of questions (that relate to the event) to increase engagement and conversation. If something happens at the event, react to it, but there is a great chance that others will be reacting (and with the hashtag) as well.

9) The show’s not over! After the event, go back and follow up on any important questions and comments you might have missed from people during the live-tweeting. People understand that things get busy and chaotic, but making sure people feel appreciated and their comments did not slip through the cracks (after the event) will show them you do care. Go back through your own posts and see what received the most comments, the most favorites, the most retweets and also look at which ones didn’t. Keep that in mind when live-tweeting at your next event to be even more effective and engaging.

10) Try Again! You could have a great event, full of great people, great fun, everything’s great, except your live-tweeting never caught on. It is ok, sometimes an approach just will not catch on. Do not give up, try live-tweeting again at your next event and figure out new attempts that might work for your crowd. There is not a cookie-cutter way for everyone, you will need to know your audience and tailor your tweeting to have them interested. If you have an event where live-tweeting took off, it is not automatic that your next one will too. Stay focused and keep trying. More times than not though, live-tweeting leads to higher engagement and followers.
There is always the chance live-tweeting is not appropriate or will not benefit your event. There is a chance that you would have better results if you tweeted more from a news reporter/journalist point, as opposed to being a fun, event-goer. Know your audience, trial and error, live and learn. I hope these tips can help you out with your future live-tweeting and always remember to charge your phone and have an extra battery.

As always, I welcome any and all comments and if you like what you read be social and share.

Dove Attempting to Wash Away Negative Online Comments

By: Gina Mason

Award season is the best time of year for stargazing and I’m not referring to looking up at the sky. At each elegant affair, Hollywood’s best and brightest shine on the red carpet and show off the latest styles and trends. If you are like me than that means you are glued to the TV taking mental notes of what and who all the celebrities are wearing.

Despite all of the fabulous gowns and beautiful jewelry on the red carpet, many viewers at home during these award shows tend to share some very ugly comments about the celebrities and even make degrading comments about them online. (i.e. “What is [insert celebrity’s name] wearing?!?” “Wow! She put on some weight!” “She looks awful!” “She is looks so old!”

In attempt to wash away this negative issue during the Oscars, Dove and Twitter have teamed up to create a powerful campaign that promotes positivity and self-esteem. Earlier this week as a part of their new #SpeakBeautiful campaign, Dove released a new ad to show how negative and degrading comments online have a domino effect on us all. This powerful ad will run during the red carpet coverage of the Oscars to remind us all about how such negativity impacts us and how positivity can change that. To check out the video, click the link below:

In addition to the ad, “Dove will be making use of a Twitter tool on Oscar night that identifies certain key words — in this case, it will keep an eye out for those that mention, appearance and body image. The tool will flag negative tweets and Dove’s Twitter account — which will be manned by self-esteem experts — will tweet positive responses” according to Mashable.

A Dove spokesperson said, “Twitter is a powerful platform for building momentum around social issues, and we think it’s a good way to leverage the unique parts of the site to support things that matter. We want to help shift the conversation toward positivity.”

This campaign was in response to some staggering data that Twitter collected when it comes to social media and self-esteem:
• 8 out of 10 women encounter negative comments on social media that critique women’s looks.
• Women are 50 percent more likely to say something negative about themselves than positive on social media.
• 82 percent of women surveyed feel the beauty standards set by social media are unrealistic.
• 4 out of every 5 negative tweets Twitter identified about beauty and body image are women talking about themselves.”

I love this idea and I think it is the perfect platform to launch this type of campaign. What better way to promote this positive message than during one of the most watched shows of the year? I applaud Dove for trying to make a positive change in the world and promote the beauty in all of us. I think we have all been guilty of unfairly and negatively critiquing celebrities and more importantly, ourselves and it is a great reminder how we need to change the way we think about ourselves. We all have our own beauty and one small positive change can make a big difference.

What do you think of this campaign? Do you think it will be successful in stopping some the negativity that goes on during award shows? If it is successful, do you think this will translate into other live events?
As always, if you like what you read, be social and share.

The Difference Between Marketing and Public Relations

By: MJ Pedone

The terms marketing and public relations seem to always be confused and intertwined. While they do compliment each other, there certainly is a difference between the two. I’m frequently asked the difference and below I have included the differences.

Marketing
Marketing is the development of an image through collateral strategies such as your website, logo, ads, writing, social media, bio and a media kit. Experienced marketing and design professionals will assist with writing and developing your marketing materials, which will save you money in the long run. Marketing professionals will brand you the way you want and in a timely fashion.

Public Relations
Public Relations is the development and management of an image. This consists of media outreach which includes print, tv, radio, digital, social media, blogging, charity/non-profit outreach, obtaining endorsements and the distribution of press releases and media kits.

The majority of people think that public relations is an area where they can save money and do the work themselves. Writing press releases and sending them to media outlets isn’t quite as easy as it sounds. The time involved in writing the releases and researching the correct contacts can take almost an entire day. Do you know the techniques involved in writing an eye-catching press release and how to obtain the correct contacts to submit your release to? Or how to “pitch” your story so that those reading it are eager to hear more and feature you? Editors today are over-pitched and hit the delete button very quickly so you will need to make sure that you don’t fall into that category.

Here are some tips when you should hire a PR expert:
• You have a solid marketing plan in place
• You want to utilize a professional who has existing relationships with the media
• You understand the value of hiring a team experienced in executing successful PR campaigns.
• You realize that although you have experience in your industry, a PR professional will brings added value to the table
• You realize that you won’t gain the earned media and awareness that you seek by just talking about it and need to hire someone who can

The power of PR can catapult your brand instantly. Start with a solid marketing plan using experienced professionals and than launch your PR campaign with a public relations team who has the experience and contacts to do so. Let the publicist do what they do best while you tend to the day-to-day needs of your business.

Do you use a publicist to get the message out for your company? Is your campaign effective? As always, we welcome your comments and if you like what you read, be social and share.

Four Great Ways to Generate Publicity

By: Jenifer Wetterau

One of the big challenges in PR is making your client’s brand perpetually relevant. It can be quite tough to come up with fresh ideas to pitch and post at those inevitable times the company finds itself in a newsworthy content drought. Touting the same product or service day after day will only serve to turn customers off – exactly what you DON’T want to happen. So what do power publicists do to earn media mentions? Here are a few ideas:

Make the most of every event</strong
Many brands are great at building buzz before events, but the most successful ones continue to generate publicity during, and long after the guests go home. Make the most of all the hard work you put into the event by live-streaming it with a top-tier broadcaster, allowing online viewers to act as voyeurs. Create a unique hashtag and tease it out a few weeks prior to, and during, the event. You should also record footage for multiple follow up posts and to tease your next event. Great, sharable visuals will always boost your brand image. The last thing you may want during a stressful event is to give yourself more work, but this will pay off infinitely. Offer your audience multiple ways to interact with the event and they will generate news for you. Keep the conversation going and the content from your event will continue to spread throughout the interwebs.

Newsjacking
Talk about what people are talking about, when they are talking. To practice real time marketing communication, identify a hot, trending topic and jump on it. Give your opinion on something that’s relevant to the brand and adds value to the story. Very easy, and since both Twitter and Facebook’s display real time trending topics, it’s a no-brainer when you’re in a pinch. The key is time is of the utmost essence. You don’t want to be late to the party, posting content on a topic that’s been long-exhausted.

Tap into tastemakers
Not every brand has a large budget to hire a celebrity to endorse their products. The next best thing? Your customers. They are appealing because they speak authentically and offer credible, unbiased reviews. People are more likely to believe a peer more than polished marketing and PR content. How do you tap into this resource? Give influential members a sneak peek into your service, offer a demo to select people, or send your product to key influencers. Your brand ambassadors will do the rest! Everyone loves to be asked for their opinion. Make sure to monitor and engage with their feedback.

Get involved with a charity
Tying your brand to a charitable organization not only demonstrates the altruistic nature of your company, but also offers additional media opportunities. Whenever the charity is in the news, you will most likely be mentioned as well. Give your time, product, and use your staff and resources to do something exciting and different to help the charity.

Your turn. What are your favorite strategies to hold the media and public’s attention for your clients? I’m interested in what has worked for you.

As always, if you like what you read, be social and share.

Media Magnetism – 21st Century Publicity Foreword Written by MJ Pedone

About

About    Inspiration often arrives at unexpected moments and in diverse forms. Media Magnetism, for instance, owes its origins to a pack of Crest Glide dental floss.I had been sent by the local newspaper to do a feature story on the latest charity project of a prominent philanthropist. He graciously invited me to his office, pointed me to a comfortable chair and listened with interest to my prep-talk on how the interview would proceed as I set up my audio recording equipment on his desk.Within the first minute of my starting the tape, he casually reached into his shirt pocket and withdrew a white plastic container. I initially thought that it contained breath mints and was, thus, perplexed when he unspooled a long strand of dental floss. Having interviewed former smokers who occasionally rely on “props” to give their hands something to do, I assumed this was just one of the quirkier choices.

You can imagine my reaction when he began using it for its actual purpose. If you’ve ever tried to decipher what someone is saying when they’re in a cavernous mid-yawn, try doing it when they’re aggressively going after mystery particles on their back molars. Over the course of 20 minutes – although it seemed much longer – he not only executed an intensely methodical cleaning worthy of a dental hygienist but also deposited all of his floss shrapnel in a messy, discolored mound right next to my microphone. No matter how scintillating or insightful the takeaway value of the feature story which was subsequently published, I can no longer see this man’s name or hear about the good deeds of his organization without recalling that unflattering image and feeling instantly repulsed.

I’m guessing that’s probably not the message he was going for.

What possesses an otherwise articulate, intelligent and well groomed person to perform personal hygiene tasks in front of a total stranger?  Were his actions a purposeful show of disdain for media intrusions on his life? Did he have someplace else he had to be immediately after our appointment and was just multi-tasking to save a trip to the bathroom? Had I inadvertently donned my cloak of invisibility and caused him to think he was talking to himself?

You’re right. There is neither an acceptable excuse for the full-frontal floss fest nor a rewind button to pretend it didn’t happen.

Although he currently holds the unofficial record for bizarre interview behavior, he’s also by no means an isolated case when it comes to putting the wrong foot forward. Interactions with media professionals sometimes have a funny way of making people say too much, say too little, or fall victim to the conversational equivalent of a wardrobe malfunction. No matter how accomplished they are at running a business, raising money or engaging in creative endeavors such as writing or art, these talents may not be evident to the reading/watching/listening public if they’re predisposed to view every reporter as (1) their new best friend or (2) their worst enemy. In truth, reporters are neither one: they are just there to help you deliver the best possible story to your target audience.

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FOREWORD Written By: MJ Pedone

There has always been a certain stigma attached to “dream jobs” – acting, modeling, sports, advertising –  the type of professions that a lot of people wish they could have and, more often than not, mistakenly perceive as being more “fun” than actual “work.” Who wouldn’t, for instance, want to play exciting roles, be photographed in top designer clothes, play the same sport they’ve loved ever since they were kids, or schmooze with celebrity clients at the hippest restaurants and night clubs?

What you have to take into consideration, however, is that the general public usually only sees the finished product – the blockbuster movie at the Cineplex, the gorgeous spread in a fashion magazine or the success of a charity or red carpet event that raises big money and brings out the A-list stars. The fact that it looks like such a flawless presentation is a testament to how much time, effort and creativity took place behind the scenes, much more than most can even imagine.

This is the reason why I always say that people will never really know how long it takes you to do something; they will only know whether it has been done well. If you have ever opened a new business, you’ve probably already discovered that you can’t just send out one generic press release and wait for the world to beat a path to your door. In today’s competitive marketplace – and given the challenging economy – it requires a more aggressive approach if you want to make your brand a household name that stands out from the competition. What I call “backstage readiness” is not only the ability to understand how 21st century media really works but also how to deliver what it wants from you in a way that projects confidence, credibility and professionalism.

Like Christina Hamlett and the team of industry experts she has brought together to create Media Magnetism, I’m no stranger to the bounty of elements that contribute to a successful marketing/PR campaign. Yes, it’s exciting for me to do a job that I love all hours of the day and night and work with my A-list clientele in the entertainment and sports industry. My effectiveness, however  –  and, in fact, the effectiveness of anyone involved in media relations – is only as good as the clarity of the client’s message and our mutual understanding of the target demographic that particular message is intended to inspire.

Whether you’re a small business owner, a nonprofit organization or an artist with a new project to promote, understanding how to maximize the media resources available to you is the first step in moving your PR campaign forward, and that is whyMedia Magnetism is a must-read for all who are involved in any aspect of public relations. This book will be the reason why you earn the exposure and return-on-investment you seek for your clients. It will be the reason that members of the media will be excited to shine a spotlight on you and your company’s accomplishments. It will be the reason you succeed.

In closing, I’m humbled to have written this foreword and hope you enjoy what I consider to be one of the most informative communications books available to date.

MJ Pedone CEO & Publicist

Indra Public Relations – New York, NY